Landscapes - People - Global change

Tag: What I’m doing (Page 1 of 13)

ResNet AGM, in person

The PIs and partners discussing strategic planning in groups at Jouvence, during the ResNet AGM in Orford, QC, May 4-5, 2022.

It was wonderful to be physically present with about 60 of the national NSERC ResNet team at Jouvence in Orford, QC, for the first in person event since we were funded in mid-2019. It was a wonderful event, substantively and socially. Over 30 students and postdocs attended and drove discussions of science and ethics alike, and networked into working groups to strengthen linkages between the landscape, theme and synthesis teams into the second half of the project. There was lots of fun, including campfires and a pub viewing of my NHK debut . I got lots of new ideas for L1 (the Bay of Fundy dykelands and tidal wetlands case study) from talking to the students and postdocs about their work and returned to work reinvigorated, if exhausted.  It was also really the first chance for the L1 team to gather together, and I enjoyed the extra time in this lovely setting to get to know one another.

Some of the L1 team during the mapping workshop on the first night of the ResNet AGM.

Quebec’s return to indoor masking was a bit of a relief, and Danika van Proosdij and I took two days to drive each way for additional protection. It seems to have worked. That drive gave us the opportunity to show newly arrived L1 ResNet postdoc, Lara Cornejo, around the Bay of Fundy region. It was also my first time to the Converse dyke realignment site, though I didn’t find it as cold as Lara, and it was great to have Danika there as a tour guide. We also stopped by the St. Lawerence wetlands at La Pocatiere, and to see the wetland recovery where the tidal gate was removed on the Petitcodiac in Moncton.

Return road trip from Quebec, with Danika and new postdoc Lara, we took time to visit the Converse realignment project, with the Amherst wind farm in the background.

Congrats to grads and Krysta as valedictorian

Krysta delivers her valedictorian speech at yesterday's SRES graduation.

Krysta delivers her valedictorian speech at yesterday’s SRES graduation.

Our second online graduation happened yesterday afternoon, and was a proper delight. Great to see students in their mortarboards, some together on patios, some at their day jobs, all laughing and celebrating together. Especially proud of Krysta Sutton who was nominated by her MES peers to be valedictorian. She and Megan Fuller, MREM valedictorian, did us absolutely proud, leaving us feeling both cockle-warmed and chuckle-full.  Bless Brenda and her Powerpoint skills for a silly and sweet event all around.

30% chance of snow

Leaving work, mid-way and almost home, Nov 3, 2020.

Leaving work, mid-way and almost home, Nov 3, 2020.

Every year, the first snow takes us by surprise here in Halifax. Today’s commute was an interesting one, thanks to a forecast of 30% chance of snow, and my choice of puffy vest, sneakers and short socks. Those without snow tires were similarly caught out. Happy to be home.

Northwest Arm, Sept 25, 7:50 am

View up the Northwest Arm, early morning, Sept 25, 2020.

View up the Northwest Arm, early morning, Sept 25, 2020.

Bookending this week with pictures of my daily commute, which is quite a pleasure these days. It’s not just the lower traffic with people working at home, though that is nice, it’s that I’ve finally been able to get back to commuting on foot. The Halifax Regional Municipality changed the buffer distance for students to qualify for bussing this year down to 1.6 kms this year – we are 1.7 km from the school. So instead of spending 80 minutes in the car a day,  waiting in long lineups to get through the bottlenecks at the Armdale Rotary and feeling like part of the problem, I’m spending 80 minutes walking, in part along the lovely and narrow Northwest Arm. The above is a view of the Arm from that self-same Rotary, harder to appreciate when jockeying traffic. I wonder how many other families could be using more active transportation if bussing were more widely available?

Dam removal in Europe

Esa Fahlen hosting an actual dam removal in Sweden as part of a Dam Removal Europe Webinar, Canada Day, 2020.

Esa Fahlen at an actual dam removal in Sweden as part of a Dam Removal Europe Webinar, Canada Day, 2020.

An interesting way to spend Canada Day morning is tuning into a Dam Removal webinar for practitioners from Dam Removal Europe. The real draw for me was the fact that they are crossing regularly to a live dam removal happening on the Marieberg Power Plant in the Mörrumsån river, Sweden. The removal is a collaboration with a power company, Uniper. Great panelists from the UK, France, US, Sweden as well as from the US where there is such a long history of dam removal. Good to see some discussion of sometimes contrasting cultural values as well as generous sharing of errors that advocates have learned along the way.

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