Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Tag: Ecosystem services (page 1 of 3)

Urban paper in Ecosystem Services

Planning imperatives related to ecosystem services in urban planning (Figure 3 in Thompson et al. 2019)

Planning imperatives related to ecosystem services in urban planning (Figure 3 in Thompson et al. 2019)

Congratulations to Kate Thompson, for the first of her PhD comprehensive papers which has just come out in Ecosystem Services. Kate reviewed dozens of municipal plans in Canada, coding deductively for ecosystem services concepts using the new CICES framework, and synthesized what she found into a useful new model for urban planners. The paper, The use of ecosystem services concepts in Canadian municipal plans, translates ecosystem services to ‘planning imperatives’: protect ES supply, mimic and rebuild ES, and capitalize on ES. I am sure this paper will be useful to scholars and practitioners alike.

Planning workshop at McGill

Hard at work while Andy Gonzalez and Marie-Josee Fortin talk monitoring.

Hard at work while Andy Gonzalez and Marie-Josee Fortin talk monitoring.

Cleared by surgeon to return to work last Monday. Left that afternoon for a two-day trip to Montreal for a workshop to plan a new NSERC project using ecosystem services to aid decision-making in production landscapes. Landscape and thematic teams from across the country joined with engaged partners from across the public and private sector, all inspired by the big vision and strong leadership of Prof Elena Bennett. Thrilled to be co-leading the Atlantic case study for this big new proposal, with such a great interdisciplinary team, and also enjoyed being the SSHRC devil’s advocate in the mix.

 

New paper on farm fragmentation

The variety of farm geographies in Nova Scotia, by number of parcels and time to drive across.

The variety of farm geographies in Nova Scotia, by number of parcels and time to drive across.

When I first started to do farm biodiversity research in Nova Scotia, after doing the same in Australia, I was surprised by how small and sometimes fragmented the farms were (see above). I wondered if that was a boon or a bust for farm biodiversity. Did having a contiguous farm make the farmer see it more as an ecosystem, and thus make them more likely to foster biodiversity, or did having a fragmented farm make the farmer set aside far-flung places for such purposes? Turns out fragmentation has no real impact on farm habitat provision; farm area does. Read about it at The Canadian Geographer.

Caitlin’s first paper

See the difference?

See the difference?

I’ve been enjoying peripheral involvement with Peter Tyedmer’s students working on pollination ecosystem services. First, Andony Melathopoulos showed how tenuous ecosystem service valuations are, using pollination services as an example. Now, Caitlin Cunningham has shown how critical it is to get local field data. The first paper out of her MES thesis uses the InVEST model to explore the carrying capacity of several Nova Scotia counties for honeybees, and shows how important it is to get boots on the ground rather than rely on proxies such as ecological land classifications and other such base spatial data infrastructure. The good news for the bee industry is coming in the next paper. Congratulations, Caitlin.

Meeting at Carleton’s Fahrig Lab

A diversity of scholars hard at work at Carleton on issues of sustainable agricultural landscape patterns and ecosystem services.

A diversity of scholars hard at work at Carleton on issues of sustainable agricultural landscape patterns and ecosystem services.

Thanks to Lenore Fahrig and her team at Carleton, as well as funding from NSERC, for the opportunity to participate yesterday in a meeting of minds about sustainable agricultural landscapes and ecosystem services. Significant snowfall created a cloistered feel and a productive mindset. While numbers were dominated by ecologists, agricultural and spatial scientists from universities, government and NGOs, it was a welcoming and collaborative environment, and ideas about the integration of social science research and stakeholder engagement were greeted enthusiastically.

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