Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Tag: climate adaptation (page 1 of 4)

Bernard on CBC Info Morning

Nice to hear my co-supervised PhD student Bernard Soubry on CBC Halifax’s Information Morning today, talking about what the new IPCC report on Land Use and Climate Change means for farming in Nova Scotia. He drew on his interviews with farmers and other food system experts across the Maritimes over the past few years. The clip is here.

OECD Rising Seas report release

OECD ad for new Rising Seas report

OECD ad for new Rising Seas report

Last summer I led the writing of a case study on an innovative coastal adaptation project underway in Truro, Nova Scotia, a place plagued by flooding for decades. A confluence of provincial department interests enabled collaboration on a dyke realignment and salt marsh restoration project in the absence of overarching climate adaptation or coastal protection policy. That case study was Canada’s contribution to an OECD report (featuring case studies also from New Zealand, Germany and the United Kingdom). That report , “Responding to Rising Seas: OECD Country Approaches to Tackling Coastal Risk“, was released this week with a webinar from Paris (slides here). I was proud that OECD’s Lisa Danielson, who also joined us in Halifax for our workshop on the case study last November, highlighted the Truro case during the session. The report features some excellent synthesis of learnings from the four case studies, as well as some novel analysis on cost-benefit ratios for adaptation action for the world’s coasts: sadly rural areas aren’t going to pay for themselves this way, so novel finance options will be needed.

OECD's Lisa Danielson speaks to the Truro case study at the Rising Seas webinar, March 6, 2019

OECD’s Lisa Danielson speaks to the Truro case study at the Rising Seas webinar, March 6, 2019

Flooding and adaptation on the Wolastoq

Saint John River flooding near Maugerville, Dec 26, 2018.

Saint John River flooding near Maugerville, Dec 26, 2018.

Weather was fine for my drives back and forth to Fredericton for Christmas, but the rains that had come a few days before were clearly taking their toll. The Saint John River (Wələstəq) commonly sees spring flooding, particularly bad this past year, but Christmas floods are not common.  I took the 105 from Sheffield to Fredericton both ways, and the flooding along Maugerville and the Nashwaak looked like spring, save the ice pans in the river.

It was also interesting, however, to see residents taking action. After the last floods, the government offered to buy severely damaged homes (>80% of assessed value in damage), or pay out a higher amount (15% more to help with moving, raising, etc) if the homeowners would sign a document agreeing never to ask for flood compensation from the government again. I wonder if this monetary incentive to adapt in situ was the reason for some of the works I saw along the 105 during my drive. The Saint John River is still affected by Bay of Fundy tides at this point, so sea level rise will only make this area more affected in future. Whether these adaptations are fit-for-purpose remains to be seen.

Land built up and home raised with new foundations along Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Land built up and home raised with new foundations along Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Based on the amount of land disturbance, this house may have been moved back as well as up. Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Based on the amount of land disturbance, this house may have been moved back as well as up. Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Apparent new hill for this pretty little house to perch on, Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.Apparent new hill for this pretty little house to perch on, Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Apparent new hill for this pretty little house to perch on, Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Riprap and raising, for this house, Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

Riprap for this house, possibly a new construction, Rte 105, Dec 26, 2018.

 

New postdoc opening: Social Dynamics of Nature-based Coastal Adaptation

Wild child with storm surge, Regatta Point, March 3, 2018.

Wild child with storm surge, Regatta Point, March 3, 2018.

As of March 21, DEADLINE EXTENDED to April 15, 2018 for May start.
Thanks to a recent funding decision I’m circulating a new postdoctoral fellowship opportunity to work on a project with Dr Danika van Proosdij and I. This postdoc will be based in Danika’s lab at Saint Mary’s University, and work closely with us both to lead landscape social science around nature-based coastal adaptations such as dykeland realignment, salt marsh restoration, managed retreat and natural shorelines. This postdoc will support the new Making Room for Movement project and be part of an emerging interdisciplinary community of practice in the region on coastal climate adaptation. It could hardly be more timely, given the significant storm surge we’ve had the past few days. Please help me spread the good news!

 

Soubry webinar on climate change and ag

ACORN (Atlantic Canadian Organic Research Network) is sponsoring a Climate Change & Agriculture Webinar Series, that started yesterday, Jan 23, with PhD candidate Bernard Soubry talking about his Masters research on climate change and adaptation Maritime small-scale farms in the Maritimes. The next two also look interesting, by Connor Stedman, from AppleSeed Permaculture, on climate adaptive (Jan 30) and carbon farming (Feb 13). Sadly, not free to non-members.

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