Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Tag: research trainees (page 1 of 8)

Congratulations, Kristine

Kristine Dahl, Masters candidate at U of A, photographed at SRM back in 2011

Congratulations to Kristine Dahl, MSc candidate on the SSHRC-funded Reconciling HM project, for winning the AltaLink Master’s Scholarship in Rangeland Disturbance Ecology. Kristine is based at the University of Alberta, supervised by project collaborators John Parkins and Ed Bork. She has just had a busy mixed-methods field season interviewing western ranchers about their grazing practices and decision-making as well as undertaking rangeland assessments. Not many people are able to do both well. Glad to have her on the team.

ESRI Canada ‘App of the Month’

McNally's Ferry - erstwhile town and transportation infrastructure on the Saint John River, pre-Mactaquac Dam and today.

McNally’s Ferry – erstwhile town and transportation infrastructure on the Saint John River, pre-Mactaquac Dam and today.

Congratulations to MREM alum Larissa Holman, for news that our Before the Mactaquac Dam storymap was selected as ESRI Canada’s App of the Month for October (French version here).  Larissa worked with me back in 2015 supported by Energy Transitions (Parkins PI) SSHRC funding.  Larissa is now working with Ottawa Riverkeepers, and reports that her job:

… is a nice mix of keeping on top of projects, investigation work when someone reports pollution or odd activity on the river, working with some really wonderful and knowledgeable volunteers and the occasional canoe trip or boat ride out on the river.

A great alum story for a lovely fall day.

Welcome, Wesley and Bernard

New postdoc, Wesley Tourangeau

Monday was an exciting day in my ‘lab’. Postdoctoral fellow Wesley Tourangeau arrived from Ontario to start research on the Reconciling HM project. Wesley brings a background in using discourse analysis to understand controversy and risk in agri-food issues, such as GMOs and animal welfare. He will starting out by engaging with my Falkland Islands case study data, as well as Sarbpreet‘s work  on producer magazines. Welcome, Wes!

New DPhil candidate, Bernard Soubry

The same day I finally met in person Bernard Soubry, Mount Allison alum and Rhodes Scholar, who has just finished his Masters at Oxford. I helped out at the latter stages of his write-up, which has thus far produced two working papers on adapting Maritime farming to climate change, published by the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford. One paper maps farmer observations against climate projections, and the other explores adaptation options for small-scale farmers. He will be rolling his research into a DPhil with me as a co-supervisor. Welcome, Bernard!

Welcome, Carolyn

Carolyn won’t be wielding any test tubes with us.

Great to have Carolyn Mann joining our sustainable grazing team, working remotely from Ottawa. Carolyn is finishing up her Masters at Dalhousie’s Agricultural Campus in parallel with this part time research contract. Her Masters sees her combining soil testing with farmer interviews about soil quality. She won’t be wielding any test tubes in her work with me, however. Carolyn will be launching the third stream of our Reconciling HM SSHRC project: talking to HM trainers to understand whether HM farmers are born, or made.  Welcome aboard.

Angling for answers

Bilingual material about making space for shorebirds to rest this migration season.

Bilingual material about making space for shorebirds to rest this migration season.

As shorebirds start to arrive in the Bay of Fundy on their annual migration back south, it is a good time to report on our recent survey with striped bass anglers and outline our plans for the summer. We implemented an online survey with anglers who use key roosting sites in the Minas Basin, particularly ‘the Guzzle‘, to help us explore options for sharing beach space with migrating shorebirds at their high-tide resting period. This was in lieu of trying to assemble a workshop or focus group. The response was excellent, and we are now sharing the results here (PDF). On the basis of this feedback, and engagement with beach users in Avonport, our other key site, we have developed bilingual materials (above) that explain why, where and how to help shorebirds rest to ensure a successful migration back south: it’s a three-day trip over the Gulf of Mexico and they can’t swim! With anglers and other beach users we have identified lesser-used areas of each site to pilot setting aside at high tide for shorebird roosting, The back of the above card features a tide table that shows the times in August 2017 that we hope people will leave the sites for bird use, and signs at each place will explain further. We enjoyed this process of developing conservation ideas WITH beach users, many of whom are already great stewards of these birds. Space to Roost researcher Jaya Fahey will then be monitoring bird disturbance this year, as she did last year, and we’ll hope to see a difference.

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