Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Tag: research trainees (page 1 of 6)

2017 spring convocation

MES graduand Yan Chen and her parents with me.

MES graduand Yan Chen and her parents with me.

Congratulations to our Spring 2017 graduands who convocated yesterday. Despite playing hooky from the ceremony itself, I was really pleased to see some of the students I worked with and their families. Yan Chen’s parents had come all the way from China to see her cross the stage (above) to receive her MES based on work on Instagram in my lab. Caitlin Cunningham’s parents were visiting from St. Catharines to see her receive her MES on mapping pollination services and potential, based on work led by Peter Tyedmers that I enjoyed helping with. Finally, I got to give a hug to Mhari Lamarque, graduating MREM, who did her internship with DUC and is now working for DUC and I both.  Such events are one of the more satisfying parts of being a professor.

Yan Chen at IAIA in Montreal

Yan Chen chatting with another attendee at IAIA 2017 in Montreal.

Yan Chen chatting with another attendee at IAIA 2017 in Montreal.

Congratulations to Yan Chen, who represented Energy Transitions in Canada at this year’s International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) meeting in Montreal. Climate change was the main theme this year. This conference is less academic than most she has attended and includes many people from the private sector and government departments, including consultants ‘selling’ their new services and tools. Her presentation, Using geo-tagged social media data to map landscape values, was in the second half of the session titled “Digital Impact Assessment”, Wednesday afternoon, April 5th, along with two other presenters focused on pipelines. She talked about her work using Instagram to understand landscape values around hydroelectricity proposals in BC (Site C) and NB (Mactaquac). She was keeping an eye out for the team about news around new SIA tools leveraging social media, but didn’t see much.

 

Riparian management survey in prep

Mhari Lamarque prepares our new landholder survey on Riparian Management practices for mailout.

Mhari Lamarque prepares our new landholder survey on Riparian Management practices for mailout.

Great to see things have gotten moving towards our new Nova Scotia farmer survey. Today, lab team member Mhari (MREM 2016) started placing selected farmer addresses on the outgoing envelopes. These envelopes will be filled with copies of surveys when those are finally approved next week by the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture. This is the first time we will also be including a sort of incentive in the package: an individually wrapped teabag. We mean this as an indicator of how long the survey should take (i.e. steeping time), but also our hope that farmers treat themselves to a nice cuppa afterward. We’ll see how that plays out.

Summer Graduate RA position open

To staff up my sustainable grazing / climate change SSHRC project, I’m looking to hire a local graduate student as a summer research assistant. The specs are quite broad, including the possibility of doing research on bibliometrics, discourse analysis, policy, or farmer extension/education. The project will be designed to suit the candidate, but there must be interest in independent research. It could be ongoing, and fit as a project/internship/practicum/thesis in a range of programs, or be a contract if the candidate is graduating. Read the details  here, and apply by email to me if interested by April 1.

Funding for sustainable grazing research

I am excited about my incoming 2017 complement of graduate students, but have one last gap to fill, whether for Masters (MES) or PhD. I’m looking for someone to contribute to my SSHRC-funded Insight Grant on adaptive grazing and climate change. Much of the field-based research for that grant is being led from the University of Alberta by grant collaborators John Parkins and Ed Bork. The work being based in Halifax is focused more on policy, training and scholarly discourse around sustainable grazing. A range of topics are available to align with a range of student backgrounds and interests: information management, political science, anthropology, sociology, public administration, education, agricultural extension. Methods could range widely from discourse analysis, social network analysis, cognitive mapping, Q-methodology, surveys, interviews, bibliometrics, and program evaluation techniques. If any of the above sounds like you and you have an interest in applied research, experience with independent scholarship (first-authored papers if applying for a PhD), and a strong GPA, get in touch to discuss mutual interests.

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