Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Category: Landscape (page 1 of 22)

New paper in PLOS Biology

A re-thinking of the pre-dam Site C conceptual map from Yan Chen's Masters thesis, as used in this paper, accompanied by Google Earth imagery of the Site C dam site, 2012 and 2019 respectively.

A re-thinking of the pre-dam Site C conceptual map from Yan Chen’s Masters thesis, as used in this paper, accompanied by Google Earth imagery of the Site C dam site near Fort St. John, BC, in 2012 and 2019 respectively.

Thanks to Ivan Jarić, from the Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, for inviting Yan Chen and I onto this interesting new paper out in PLOS Biology today, Expanding conservation culturomics and iEcology from terrestrial to aquatic realms. This geographically and disciplinarily diverse writing team led to many rich conversations and debates as the manuscript took shape. The idea was to differentiate the emerging field of iEcology from conservation culturomics, and advocate for their application in aquatic realms which have a dearth of data. Our work on advancing social impact assessment of hydroelectricity and dyke realignment using Instagram datasets provided one of the six key areas of application outlined in this paper.

Northwest Arm, Sept 25, 7:50 am

View up the Northwest Arm, early morning, Sept 25, 2020.

View up the Northwest Arm, early morning, Sept 25, 2020.

Bookending this week with pictures of my daily commute, which is quite a pleasure these days. It’s not just the lower traffic with people working at home, though that is nice, it’s that I’ve finally been able to get back to commuting on foot. The Halifax Regional Municipality changed the buffer distance for students to qualify for bussing this year down to 1.6 kms this year – we are 1.7 km from the school. So instead of spending 80 minutes in the car a day,  waiting in long lineups to get through the bottlenecks at the Armdale Rotary and feeling like part of the problem, I’m spending 80 minutes walking, in part along the lovely and narrow Northwest Arm. The above is a view of the Arm from that self-same Rotary, harder to appreciate when jockeying traffic. I wonder how many other families could be using more active transportation if bussing were more widely available?

Keynoting ISSRM

Really honoured to have been asked by IASNR to keynote this year’s ISSRM meeting after it was moved online. While I would love to be sitting around with my colleagues in Cairns, Australia, the originally planned host city, I’m so far enjoying the online presentations and live Q&A engagement. My keynote synthesizes my work on climax thinking, drawing insights from the work of MES students Kristina Keilty, Ellen Chappell and Krysta Sutton in contexts as diverse as potential dam removal, wind energy, and coastal adaptation. I am looking forward to the live Q&A for the keynote session on Wednesday morning, and the rest of the conference as it rolls out over the next two weeks.

Pre-ordering open for Energy Impacts book

New edited volume cover

New edited volume cover

Excited to see that the new edited volume by Jacquet, Haggerty and Theodori, Energy Impacts, A Multidisciplinary Exploration of North American Energy Development, is finally available for pre-order. This book has come out of a US NSF-funded grant held by the editors, which provided the opportunity for a great symposium as well. I workshopped climax thinking at the symposium in Ohio back in 2017, and subsequently submitted my original framework chapter, From climax thinking toward a non-equilibrium approach to public good landscape changeto the resulting book, and so have been getting a little impatient for its release. John Parkins and I also submitted a methodological piece on Q-methodology across scales. It is good news to finally learn that the book will be available for download or shipping later in 2020. While my chapter is not limited at all to impacts in energy, the ideas first emerged while working on the Mactaquac dam and headpond back in the mid 2010s. Nice that this is out around the same time that I’m delivering a keynote at ISSRM 2020 (online) about climax thinking and the empirical work that has been done since I wrote this chapter.

MES opportunity for fall 2020 or 2021

** This position has now been filled **

I am still looking for an MES student to work on Mi’kmaw cultural ecosystem services in Bay of Fundy dykelands and salt marshes, starting either fall 2020 or 2021. This will explore how Mi’kmaq use and value the drained agricultural land (dykelands) and the salt marshes they replaced (and to which sections will return if abandoned or realigned). This student will become part of the Atlantic landscape case of NSERC ResNet, a national collaborative project designed to develop the utility of ecosystems service approaches for resolving complex resource decisions. Candidates should be socially curious, ideally trained in social science fields (e.g. first degrees in Geography, Environmental Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Planning, etc.) and interested in qualitative methods such as semi-structured interviews, ethnography, photo or map elicitation, etc. First Nation students are particularly encouraged to apply for this, but all applications are welcome. Our partner, Mi’kmaw Conservation Group, is offering the opportunity to embed within their organization to improve community integration, regardless of background. Email me if you are interested.

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