Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Category: Climate change (page 1 of 12)

Bye, Tuihedur

H. M. Tuihedur Rahman heads back to McGill to another postdoc after 2.5 years working at Dal/SMU.

H. M. Tuihedur Rahman heads back to McGill to another postdoc after 2.5 years working at Dal/SMU.

Last week, I got to have a nice face-to-face but socially distanced send-off at the lovely Tart’n’Soul cafe with postdoc Tuihedur Rahman, who has been working for the last two and a half years, spanning SMU (supervisor Danika van Proosdij), and me. The Making Room for Movement project, funded by NRCan’s Climate Change Adaptation Fund, 2018-2020, has produced lots of interesting insights for synthesis, and Tuihedur has led–and is still leading–these papers. Thank you, Tuihedur.

Keynoting ISSRM

Really honoured to have been asked by IASNR to keynote this year’s ISSRM meeting after it was moved online. While I would love to be sitting around with my colleagues in Cairns, Australia, the originally planned host city, I’m so far enjoying the online presentations and live Q&A engagement. My keynote synthesizes my work on climax thinking, drawing insights from the work of MES students Kristina Keilty, Ellen Chappell and Krysta Sutton in contexts as diverse as potential dam removal, wind energy, and coastal adaptation. I am looking forward to the live Q&A for the keynote session on Wednesday morning, and the rest of the conference as it rolls out over the next two weeks.

Soubry Editorial on COVID and Canadian food systems

A picture of Bernard Soubry farming I found floating around the web.

A picture of Bernard Soubry farming I found floating around the web.

Impressed by an editorial written for the Chronicle Herald by my PhD student Bernard Soubry, who has taken time from his final writing process to return to farm labour here in Nova Scotia. The editorial, COVID-19 shows what’s wrong with how Canada feeds itself, is a passionate and well-informed hit on Canada’s food system and dearth of adaptation plans. He writes:

But here’s a truth that researchers and rural communities have known for a long time: the food system in Canada doesn’t have a problem because of COVID-19. The food system is the problem.

On August 6, Bernard spoke to CBC Halifax’s Information Morning about his editorial; you can listen to that here.

Farzana featured on DalNews

Farzana at her new home in Corner Brook, NL.

Farzana Karim in her new home of Corner Brook, NL.

Just in time for our virtual graduation this week, nice to see that DalNews has featured recent lab alum Farzana Karim, as well as MREM alum Ben Johns.  Farzana’s thesis topic on the challenge that short-term rentals and second homes pose to climate change planning and management has only become more important since she began it. I hope that she and her MES alum husband, Tahazzud Hossein, find a good home in friendly Corner Brook, where my family hails from originally.

New paper: dykelands vs. marshes on Instagram

Clusters of landscape, cultural ecosystem services and demographics associated with Instagram images in Chen et al 2020

Clusters of landscape, cultural ecosystem services and demographics associated with Instagram images in Chen et al 2020

As decision-makers tackle the challenge of adapting Bay of Fundy dykelands to climate change, they need to understand who uses and values dykelands and salt marshes, and for what. This new paper in Ocean and Coastal ManagementComparing cultural ecosystem service delivery in dykelands and marshes using Instagram: A case of the Cornwallis (Jijuktu’kwejk) River, Nova Scotia, Canada, used four months of geocoded Instagram data to understand the cultural ecosystem service (CES) tradeoffs that might result from removing/realigning dykes and restoring salt marshes where dykelands can’t be sustained.  Dykelands provide a much wider set of CES for a wider demographic than do marshes for this set of social media users. However, a big surprise is that while salt marshes were present in many photos they were not named as such; users spoke only about the dykes and dykelands behind those marshes. As such, the marsh CES in the dataset came from visitors to an impounded freshwater wetland trail which is a local attraction walkable from the downtown centre of Kentville. Many of the messages triangulate well with the 2016 online Q survey I ran with Nova Scotians about the same topic and the paper provides another nice case study as to the utility of social media data for social impact assessment.  One of the really great things about this paper is that it is a real ‘lab’ output. The work was initiated as a follow-up to that 2016 study and to inform the new ResNet work when I knew Camille was going to be joining as an intern from AgroCampus Ouest. PhD student Yan collected a few months of Instagram posts for Camille to analyze with her help, postdoc Tuihedur helped with statistics, and then Yan picked it up again to write up after Camille went back to France. I’m proud of this paper and this collaborative team.

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