Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Category: Built (page 1 of 6)

Keynoting ISSRM

Really honoured to have been asked by IASNR to keynote this year’s ISSRM meeting after it was moved online. While I would love to be sitting around with my colleagues in Cairns, Australia, the originally planned host city, I’m so far enjoying the online presentations and live Q&A engagement. My keynote synthesizes my work on climax thinking, drawing insights from the work of MES students Kristina Keilty, Ellen Chappell and Krysta Sutton in contexts as diverse as potential dam removal, wind energy, and coastal adaptation. I am looking forward to the live Q&A for the keynote session on Wednesday morning, and the rest of the conference as it rolls out over the next two weeks.

Pre-ordering open for Energy Impacts book

New edited volume cover

New edited volume cover

Excited to see that the new edited volume by Jacquet, Haggerty and Theodori, Energy Impacts, A Multidisciplinary Exploration of North American Energy Development, is finally available for pre-order. This book has come out of a US NSF-funded grant held by the editors, which provided the opportunity for a great symposium as well. I workshopped climax thinking at the symposium in Ohio back in 2017, and subsequently submitted my original framework chapter, From climax thinking toward a non-equilibrium approach to public good landscape changeto the resulting book, and so have been getting a little impatient for its release. John Parkins and I also submitted a methodological piece on Q-methodology across scales. It is good news to finally learn that the book will be available for download or shipping later in 2020. While my chapter is not limited at all to impacts in energy, the ideas first emerged while working on the Mactaquac dam and headpond back in the mid 2010s. Nice that this is out around the same time that I’m delivering a keynote at ISSRM 2020 (online) about climax thinking and the empirical work that has been done since I wrote this chapter.

Atlantic Voice documentary

I had forgotten about my interview with local journalist Moira Donovan until an email from a colleague alerted me that the documentary she produced for CBC’s Atlantic Voice aired this morning. The short (26 minute) documentary is called Breaching Tradition, and does a nice job of telling the story of the challenges facing Bay of Fundy dykelands. Collaborators Danika van Proosdij (SMU) and Tony Bowron (CBWES) are featured as well, and several residents of areas like Nappan and Advocate Harbour whose communities and livelihoods are threatened. Donovan also put together a CBC news article by the same name: Breaching tradition: Salt marshes replacing Nova Scotia’s dikes. This is the setting and challenging management context for the case study I am co-leading in a new 5-year national NSERC project called ResNet.

Funded opportunities for fall 2020

REVISED Jan 12, 2020 – These openings are now filled.

It’s recruiting time, and I currently can offer up to three possible positions for students starting in fall 2020. More may become available in the spring as word comes about grants, but for the time being, I’d be keen to hear from students interested in the following projects:

  • Cultural ecosystem services in Bay of Fundy dykelands and salt marshes. I am looking for up to two MES to tackle research on how settlers and Mi’kmaq use and value the drained agricultural land (dykelands) and the salt marshes they replaced (and to which sections will return if abandoned or realigned). These students will become part of the Atlantic landscape case of NSERC ResNet, a national collaborative project designed to develop the utility of ecosystems service approaches for resolving complex resource decisions. Candidates should be socially curious, ideally trained in social science fields (e.g. first degrees in Geography, Environmental Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, Planning) and interested in methods such as quantitative surveys and/or semi-structured interviews. First Nation students are particularly encouraged to apply.
  • Manufacturing envy: discourses of consumption and amenity in property television. I have offered up this topic to this year’s SRES Legacy Scholarship program. The ideal candidate is a high-achieving Canadian citizen or PR, as the Legacy is limited to Canadians with a two-year GPA above 4. Suitable backgrounds would include Geography, Environmental Studies, Anthropology, Planning or Visual Art.

If you are interested, please read this before you get in touch to express interest. If you can get in touch before additional scholarship deadlines start closing in early December, that would be ideal.

Yan at SMS 2019

Yan Chen presenting at Social Media and Society 2019 in Toronto

Yan Chen presenting at Social Media and Society 2019 in Toronto

Yan Chen was in Toronto again for Social Media & Society, this time presenting collaborative work that was initiated by French intern Camille Caesemaecker, from Agrocampus Ouest. This has led Yan to thinking about a new kind of landscape change using Instagram, after her hydroelectricity work: understanding perceptions of the Bay of Fundy dykelands versus the wetlands they replaced. Those dykelands are becoming ever more difficult to sustain under sea level and storm conditions associated with climate change, and some will have to be realigned and/or restored to salt marsh. This work based on four months of Instagram support the strong female pro-dykeland factor–concerned about culture and recreation–also found through Q-method a few years ago. Nice when triangulation happens.

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