Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Month: May 2020

New paper: dykelands vs. marshes on Instagram

Clusters of landscape, cultural ecosystem services and demographics associated with Instagram images in Chen et al 2020

Clusters of landscape, cultural ecosystem services and demographics associated with Instagram images in Chen et al 2020

As decision-makers tackle the challenge of adapting Bay of Fundy dykelands to climate change, they need to understand who uses and values dykelands and salt marshes, and for what. This new paper in Ocean and Coastal ManagementComparing cultural ecosystem service delivery in dykelands and marshes using Instagram: A case of the Cornwallis (Jijuktu’kwejk) River, Nova Scotia, Canada, used four months of geocoded Instagram data to understand the cultural ecosystem service (CES) tradeoffs that might result from removing/realigning dykes and restoring salt marshes where dykelands can’t be sustained.  Dykelands provide a much wider set of CES for a wider demographic than do marshes for this set of social media users. However, a big surprise is that while salt marshes were present in many photos they were not named as such; users spoke only about the dykes and dykelands behind those marshes. As such, the marsh CES in the dataset came from visitors to an impounded freshwater wetland trail which is a local attraction walkable from the downtown centre of Kentville. Many of the messages triangulate well with the 2016 online Q survey I ran with Nova Scotians about the same topic and the paper provides another nice case study as to the utility of social media data for social impact assessment.  One of the really great things about this paper is that it is a real ‘lab’ output. The work was initiated as a follow-up to that 2016 study and to inform the new ResNet work when I knew Camille was going to be joining as an intern from AgroCampus Ouest. PhD student Yan collected a few months of Instagram posts for Camille to analyze with her help, postdoc Tuihedur helped with statistics, and then Yan picked it up again to write up after Camille went back to France. I’m proud of this paper and this collaborative team.

Nine weeks in

Morning walk on the Northwest Arm, with companion boy.

Morning walk on the Northwest Arm, with companion boy.

Nine weeks into isolation, sequestered at home with family, has been a mix of pleasure and pain. One of the nicer bits has been morning walks with my kids on nice days, skipping stones and finding modest treasure. This last is hard to come by on the armored shore around Regatta Point, but the place still holds some mysteries, particularly during very low-tide days. Revealed are old stumps, wooden culverts, rusted equipment and runaway items from the yacht club opposite. Add in the keening and clattering of the weather-wrapped yachts on a windy day, which is downright eerie, and it’s kid heaven.

Lots to find at low tide in Melville Cove

Lots to find at low tide in Melville Cove

A tiny mine tantalizes the mind.

A tiny mine tantalizes the mind.

 

Congratulations, Jaya

Jaya Fahey's defense committee, happily wrapped up.

Jaya Fahey’s defense committee, happily wrapped up.

I had my first remote Master’s defense on Friday, when Jaya Fahey ably defended her thesis on the Space to Roost program in Nova Scotia. Thanks to everyone for the good humour, despite circumstances, and congratulations to Jaya.

New paper: non-material costs of conservation for humans

Figure 2 on categories of non-material costs, from the new Thondhlana-led paper in Biological Conservation

Figure 2 on categories of non-material costs, from the new Thondhlana-led paper in Biological Conservation

Thanks to Gladman Thondhlana for leadership on a new perspective paper in Biological ConservationNon-material costs of wildlife conservation to local people and their implications for conservation interventions. My placement on this author list emerged from a chat I had with Gladman while walking between hotel and venue during ISSRM in Oshkosh, WI, last year. Americans always rent cars and drive around at conferences but the rest of us have a great time strolling and talking shop. This paper synthesizes literature from a number of countries and contexts to show that more attention is needed to measuring the non-material costs of conservation and designing socially just conservation interventions.

© 2020 Kate Sherren

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