Kate Sherren

Landscapes - People - Global change

Month: October 2019

Big week in the lab

Bernard Soubry talking about his work at the Earth Negotiations Bulletin at SRES Talks, October 12, 2019.

Bernard Soubry talking about his work at the Earth Negotiations Bulletin at SRES Talks, October 12, 2019.

Exciting week in the Sherren lab. IDPhD student Yan Chen expertly sat her first comp on Monday, covering her literature review on ‘media as social sensors’. Ellen Chappell crossed the stage Tuesday with her MES, and I got to meet her charming (and proud) parents visiting from Calgary for the event. Wednesday I pressed the submit button on my new SSHRC Insight Grant application to further develop ‘climax thinking‘. On Thursday, new MES Gardenio da Silva was honoured with other Killam scholars at the annual awards lunch. Amidst all that PhD student Bernard Soubry has been visiting from Montreal and did a great presentation Tuesday in Graduate Seminar for me on his reciprocal approach to interviewing farmers, and will speak later today in a SRES Talk on his work with the Earth Negotiations Bulletin. Busy times, but this is what it is all about.

New Falklands paper on tussac

Falkland farmers Ben Berntsen @ben_benebf and Marilou Delignières (also guide and co-author) among Ben's tussac restoration at Cape Dolphin, Falkland Islands, Nov 2016.

Falkland farmers Ben Berntsen @ben_benebf and Marilou Delignières (also guide and co-author) among Ben’s tussac restoration at Cape Dolphin, Falkland Islands, Nov 2016.

Thanks to Wes Tourangeau, the first paper is now out in People and Nature (open access) from my sabbatical trip to the Falklands back in late 2016. This emerged from my mild obsession with the 2 m high tussac grasses that once fringed the archipelago. Tussac are critical ecologically but are so delicious to stock they only tend to remain on ungrazed outer islands (which are actually called ‘tussac islands’ as a result). I never saw any up close on my first trip in 2015, which stuck quite close to Stanley, but was lucky to get out to camp in 2016 to meet some farmers who were passionate about the plant and its restoration. This paper is an environmental history of tussac in the Falklands, from its first observation by explorers, to its exploitation and its hopeful renewal despite integration in production.

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